I am what you want of me

That's Beautiful

24 Apr

(Source: hungrywhitemale)

24 Apr
‎’Slut’ is attacking women for their right to say yes. ‘Friend Zone’ is attacking women for their right to say no.

And “bitch” is attacking women for their right to call you on it.  (via madgay)

(Source: emilys-nostalgia)

23 Apr

http://diamoncls.tumblr.com/post/83462335425/stupidswampwitch-masooood-safeidgul-why

stupidswampwitch:

masooood:

safeidgul:

Why can’t there be a male hooter’s equivalent where male servers are shirtless and highly sexualized for their bodies and looks

Male Strip clubs. You’re thinking of male strip clubs.

No. Not a male strip club. A strip club is a strip…

23 Apr
Girls work on their looks, not their minds, because they know boys are stupid, not blind.

Unknown (via golden-needle)

(Source: baguettesandcigarettes)

23 Apr

(Source: vh1)

23 Apr

theuppitynegras:

just think about y’all millions and millions of little dark skinned black girls are going to go to the supermarket with their parents this month and when they’re waiting in line at the check out aisle they’re going to look up and see Lupita Nyong’o being hailed as the most beautiful woman in the world god is amazing

23 Apr

(Source: timikeybones)

23 Apr

odditiesoflife:

The Most Intense Color of Any Living Thing on Earth

Also known as the marble berry, Pollia condensata is a wild plant that grows in the forests of several African countries. The berries are not edible, but they have an extremely rare property. They produce the most intense color of any living thing on Earth. Even after the berries have been picked from the plant, they stay the same shiny, vibrant, metallic blue color for many decades.

The vast majority of colors in the biological world are produced by pigments—compounds produced by a living organism that selectively absorb certain wavelengths of light, so that they appear to be the color of whichever wavelengths they reflect.

However, the marble berry’s skin has no pigment. The berries produce their vibrant blue color through nanoscale-sized cellulose strands that scatter light as they interact with one another. Thus the fruit’s color is even visible at the cellular level as pictured above.

(Source: blogs.smithsonianmag.com)

23 Apr

(Source: mlb)

23 Apr

(Source: mrserialx)